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Dr. Muhammad Ahmad Abdul-Muttalib :: Publications:

Title:
Effect of the Cross Water Currents on the Representative Navigational ship in Egypt
Authors: Salama M M;Abdel-Motaleb M M;Elsaeed G H;Abd Almotaleb M A
Year: 2013
Keywords: Safe inland navigation, cross water currents, transverse flow velocity, representative ship, ship transverse movement.
Journal: International Journal of Academic Research
Volume: Vol. 5
Issue: No. 4
Pages: 277-288
Publisher: International Journal of Academic Research
Local/International: International
Paper Link: Not Available
Full paper Muhammad Ahmad Abd Elmotalib_Effect on Representative ship.pdf
Supplementary materials Not Available
Abstract:

For studying the effect of cross water currents on navigational ships, a representative design ship was chosen based on statistical analysis of the available data for ship units along River Nile within Egypt. In this study, a distorted scale model of 1:80 in horizontal direction and 1:20 in a vertical direction was designed. A wooden ship which is specified as the geometrical model of a design representative prototype ship was tested in rectangular flume inside the north experimental hall of the Hydraulics Research Institute (HRI). The aim of this study is to develop a set of dimension-less curves, as shown in Appendix (B). The main benefit of these curves is to produce the transverse movement of the representative design ship. This movement should be utilized to check that the navigational ship doesn’t go out from its permitted maneuvering lane, according to the specifications given by (PIANC & IAPH, 1997). Hence, this result can be used to accomplish suitable designs of outfall structures, the proper design of guide pier downstream barrage components, or to verify the safe navigable path through bends. That is all for providing an operational traffic safety for passing ships along River Nile within Egypt.

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