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Dr. Harby M. S. Mostafa :: Publications:

Title:
On-farm evaluation of low-pressure drip irrigation system for Smallholder. Soil and Water Research J. Czech Academy of Agricultural Sciences.
Authors: Mostafa, H., H-H. Thormann.
Year: 2013
Keywords: Not Available
Journal: Not Available
Volume: Not Available
Issue: Not Available
Pages: Not Available
Publisher: Not Available
Local/International: International
Paper Link:
Full paper Harby Mohamed Sorour Mostafa_On-Farm Evaluation of Low-Pressure Drip Irrigation.pdf
Supplementary materials Not Available
Abstract:

The aim of this paper was to evaluate the performance of low-pressure drip system (LPS) for three years of service, calculates the consumptive working time and costs for maintenance and laterals retrieving before harvesting and determine benefits and problems with drip irrigation. Drip irrigation provides the opportunity to save water and the potential to increase net income by applying water in the right quantity and at the right time. Small fields would benefit from LPS irrigation system which has the ability to distribute the amount of water applied. LPS is a well researched system for drip irrigation, typically those available for flood irrigated crops. There are significant agronomic advantages to using a low pressure, low flow drip system. These advantages translate into measured improved distribution uniformity when compared to flood irrigated crops and energy savings compared to flood and sprinkler irrigated crops. The old drip-line (reused) leads to decrease the distribution uniformity and increase in costs, where the distribution uniformity decreased by 10.5 and 21.6 % for reusing the laterals in the second and third year respectively. Moreover, the cost of repairing laterals was more than 5 and 6.5 times for both 2nd and 3rd season. Many disadvantages to drip lines retrieval can be observed, including that labour and maintenance is more intensive; risk of mechanical damage to lateral especially if it reused; increased management skills and experience are needed; and increased retrieval costs arise season after season.

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